Food for thought podcast

One of my favorite vegan educators is definitely Colleen Patrick-Goudreau. Her podcast Food for thought is one of my big inspiration sources. In it she talks about different issues concerning veganism; food, social situations, compassionate language, animals and so on. Colleen has a calm way and voice that makes it easy to listen, and I admire her way of always responding to people and situations compassionately.

I usually download the podcast to my phone and listen to it when I go for walks or while sitting in the bus on my way to work. It’s a great way to learn and get inspired while doing something else at the same time. Some of my favorite episodes are “How to talk to hunters (or anyone with whom you disagree)”, “Disagreement Not Disrespect” and “Life after cheese”.

You can find the podcast episodes for example on Colleen’s Soundcloud page, or through her official webpage (where you can find other information and resources as well). Definitely worth checking out! If you don’t feel like listening to a whole hour episode, there are also shorter soundbites that you can easily listen to and share with others.

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I want a vegan world!

I re-listened to one of Colleen Patrick-Goudreau’s podcasts today. Those of you who have been reading this blog for a while probably know by now that I admire Colleen greatly, she is a true inspiration for me to continue learning and writing about animals and veganism and to keep thinking compassionately.

Anyways, the podcast I listened to today is called “Turning the tables” and in the podcast she, among other things, talks about that many people believe vegans have an “agenda” to turn the whole world vegan. It reminded me of an article in the local newspaper some years ago, in 2009, in connection to a campaign by the animal activist organization Oikeutta Eläimille about ending fur farming. The article was about an own campaign the fur farming industry had started as an answer to the campaign by Oikeutta Eläimille, and it said something about that we (“the vegans” or “the activists”) start with a ban against fur and fur farming, then we want to go on to ban other types of animal farming for meat, dairy and eggs, etc.. The article was angled in a way that it seemed that this aim is something animal activists are hiding from the public, that we pretend to “only” want a ban against fur farming, but actually we want to ban all animal industry.

I was almost laughing when I read this article back then, and I still find it very ironic, because for me it has never been about any hidden agendas. I would love for the whole world to be vegan, free of animal industries, even though I don’t believe that a ban is the best way to get there. Ethical decisions like that need to come from people themselves, not from any higher authority, to be understood and have an actual point for both humans and animals. Anyway, while I was still in the local activist group we were never about hiding that we are vegans and that is what we are striving for more and more people to be. It has always been out there for people to see.

I think a vegan world would be great in so many ways, not only for the animals but also for the people and the environment. If we would show more compassion towards animals – all of the animals and not only pets, getting a more one-sided view of animals instead of the very confusing view we have now where some animals are friends and others food or products to be used – I believe it would come as a consequence that we would also be more compassionate towards one another. Veganism is not a perfect way of living or an end of something, it is one step on the way towards living as compassionately as possible, towards doing as little harm as possible.

Breaking news: You can get all the nutrients you need from a plant-based diet

Almost every time I tell a new person that I’m vegan, the same type of questions pop up; Where do you get your protein from? Are you sure you get enough calcium? What about all the important amino acids that only exist in meat? Don’t you have to take a bunch of supplements? The variation of questions goes on forever, but my conclusion is: Most people believe that a plant-based diet is not sufficient, that it will not give you all the nutrients you need, but that is simply not true.

I’m not going to write much more about this issue right now, because Colleen from The Compassionate Cook has already done a great podcast on this, and I just want to direct you to it. She talks about where these important nutrients originally come from and why we believe they are only (or mainly) found in animal products, and no it’s not boring just because it is about nutrition. The podcast is only 13 minutes long and you can listen to it here.